It’s that time of the year again, when the entire health care profession rallies together to celebrate some of its most vital members — nurses, of course.

Last Thursday, May 6, marked the start of National Nurses Week, running through Thursday, May 12, which is also International Nurses Day and the birth date of Florence Nightingale. All across the country, folks in and out of hospitals are finding ways to celebrate these seven days. Here’s a quick roundup:

  • The American Organization of Nurse Executives has a list of what’s planned for the rest of this week to celebrate nurses. As part of the festivities, the group is co-hosting a Twitter chat with the American Hospital Association Wednesday, focused on how nurse leadership in hospitals and other health care settings has evolved over the years.
  • Of course, everything tastes better when it’s free, and to satisfy that appetite, social media site allnurses.com has a list of all the places that are giving away freebies and deep discounts. Those include Cinnabon, where you can get a free cinnamon roll through Thursday, or a trove of free nurse memorabilia from Johnson & Johnson. The nurse social media site also has its own daily round of giveaways to celebrate the occasion.
  • The Huffington Post, meanwhile,is using the added attention from Nurses Week to highlight some of the biggest myths perpetuated about the profession. Some people out there still believe that nurses report to doctors, that all nurses are the same, that the country has plenty of RNs already, and that nursing is an easy job (who the heck  still thinks this?). The list comes by way of Pamela Cipriano, R.N., who is the president of the American Nurses Association.
  • Also from the ANA, the nurse group is promoting the theme of this year’s celebration as “Culture of Safety—It Starts with You,” encouraging RNs to spend these seven days talking about safety issues and how they impact patient care, according to an announcement. They’re hosting a webinar today, too, that’s on “culturally congruent care.”
  • Over at thenurseteacher.com, RN writer “Joan” has a wish list of what her colleagues in the profession     “really want” for Nurses Week. For her, those include a manageable patient load and a sense of accomplishment when she end her shift every day.

Best, worst place to work in the nation as a nurse

In other nurse news this week, personal finance website Wallet Hub just released its list of the best and worst places to work as an RN, based on 14 key metrics. Those include median starting salary, number of health facilities per capita, and nurse job openings per capita. Washington, Illinois and Texas topped the list while Hawaii, Louisiana and the District of Columbia represented the bottom. You can check out all the details here.